Injured in a crash?

Getting the help and support you need

Last updated: January 2017

If you've been injured in a crash, we want to make sure you get the help and support you need. This guide will help you learn about the programs and funding that we can provide for you. If you would like more detailed information, your claims adjuster will be glad to help you.

Every year, hundreds of people in B.C. are seriously or permanently injured in motor vehicle crashes. In our efforts to help lower the number of crashes and injuries, we fund many road safety programs.

If you've suffered serious or permanent injury in a crash, we want to help you rebuild as full a life as possible. Our recovery coordinators will help you find the medical and rehabilitation assistance you need to move quickly to the highest reasonable level of self-sufficiency. Recommendations are made by the treating doctors, vocational advisors, occupational therapists and the institutions providing rehabilitation.

Accident Benefits coverage can assist in paying for most of the expenses of medical care, specialized aids, and vocational assistance.

Accident benefits

Accident benefits help with your medical costs and may contribute towards your lost wages if you're injured in a motor vehicle crash in Canada or the U.S. — even if you're at fault.

Anyone who is in a vehicle licensed and insured in B.C. is eligible for accident benefits.

Accident benefits are also available to any cyclist or pedestrian injured in a motor vehicle crash in Canada or the U.S. if they:

  • are named in an Autoplan policy, or

  • have a valid B.C. driver's licence, or

  • are a member of the household of a person who is named in an Autoplan policy or who has a valid B.C. driver's licence.

Medical and rehabilitation expenses

Our accident benefits will reimburse you for reasonable and necessary expenses for medical and rehabilitation services to a limit of $150,000 for each person injured in a crash. This may include:

  • medical treatments

  • dental treatments

  • chiropractic treatments

  • physiotherapy treatments

  • ambulance services

  • occupational therapy

  • speech therapy

  • prosthetics

  • medication

  • medical supplies or equipment

If someone is severely injured, special needs such as attendant care are also considered.

Accident benefits do not cover expenses that may be claimed under other insurance policies, medical or hospital plans. Also, we may need to pre-authorize some of your expenses before you can be reimbursed.

Disability benefits

Disability benefits are available to any employed person who has been completely disabled in a crash and can no longer work. An employed person is someone who either had a job as of the date of the crash, or someone who didn't have a job on the date of the crash but who worked at least six months of the previous 12 months before the crash.

Your disability benefits are based on 75 per cent of your average gross weekly earnings, minus the weekly total of wage loss payments from all other sources, including Employment Insurance, Canada Pension Plan and Quebec Pension Plan benefits. You can receive a maximum of $300 per week but benefits are not payable for the first seven days of disability.

Employment Insurance and disability benefits

If you are disabled by a crash, you may be eligible for up to 15 weeks of Employment Insurance (EI) sickness benefits. If you're claiming disability benefits, you should apply for EI sickness benefits right away. To contact EI, look under Employment in the blue pages of your telephone directory or visit the Service Canada website at servicecanada.gc.ca.

There is a two-week waiting period for EI sickness benefits. During this time, your disability benefits can begin on the eighth day and cover the second week. However, once EI sickness benefits begin, they will be deducted from any Autoplan entitlement.

If you are eligible for EI benefits, ICBC will include these benefits to calculate the disability benefits owing to you — even if you do not collect your EI benefits.

Disability and homemaker benefits

These benefits are available to people whose injuries have left them totally disabled for eight days or more. Eligibility begins on the eighth day of disability.

These benefits are payable for the duration of your disability, or until you reach age 65, whichever comes first. However, there are two exceptions:

  1. If you were employed or a homemaker at the time of your crash and turned 65 after the crash:

    • you're still entitled to benefits for 104 weeks if you were completely disabled in the crash and your disability continues during that time.

    • disability and homemaker benefits will no longer be payable to you after 104 weeks.

  2. If you were over 65 and employed, or a homemaker, at the time of your crash:

    • you're entitled to benefits for 104 weeks if you were completely disabled in the crash and your disability continues during that time.

    • disability and homemaker benefits will no longer be payable to you after 104 weeks.

If you're a homemaker who is seriously disabled in a motor vehicle crash and assessed as being unable to perform most of your household tasks, you can receive up to $145 a week for a person to perform household tasks on your behalf.

However, no benefits are payable if a family member performs household tasks on your behalf. Also, no benefits are payable for the first seven days of disability.

Coverage limits

In a few situations, you may not be covered by accident benefits or your coverage may be limited. Your claims adjuster will help to explain this to you.

CPP and QPP benefits

It's good to know that disability payments are available under both the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and Quebec Pension Plan (QPP). You qualify for CPP or QPP disability benefits—at any age—if you have worked and contributed to either plan for four of the previous six years and your disability prevents you from working.

You are entitled to receive full CPP or QPP disability payments plus your full disability benefits or homemaker benefits for the first 104 weeks of your disability. However, after the first 104 weeks of disability benefits, any disability benefits you receive from CPP or QPP will be deducted from your disability benefits or homemaker benefits.

The amount of the deduction will depend on whether you are receiving benefits from other sources besides ICBC and, if so, whether these sources also call for a deduction of benefits from the Canada or Quebec Pension Plans.

Here are some examples of wage loss payable under Accident Benefits:

Example A

Your average gross weekly earnings$700
75% of average gross weekly earnings 75% of $700 =$525
Less weekly wage loss payments from all other sources-$350
Weekly disability benefits payable under Accident Benefits$175

Example B*

Your average gross weekly earnings$700
75% of average gross weekly earnings 75% of $700 =$525
Less weekly wage loss payments from all other sources-$600
Weekly disability benefits payable under Accident Benefits$0

*In example B, you would not be eligible to receive any ICBC disability benefits.

These examples show that your disability benefits depend upon your income from other sources. Remember, the maximum amount of your disability benefits is $300 a week.

More information

To report a claim, call Dial-a-Claim 24/7 at:

  • 604-520-8222 (Lower Mainland)

  • 1-800-910-4222 (rest of B.C., Canada or U.S.)

For general inquiries, call ICBC Customer Services at:

  • 604-661-2800 (Lower Mainland)

  • 1-800-663-3051 (rest of B.C., Canada or U.S.)

Translation services available.

Last updated: January 2017

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Last updated: January 2017