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Traffic Collision Statistics

British Columbia Traffic Collision Statistics is an annual publication on police-reported traffic collisions occurring in the Province. Since 1995 it has covered police-reported collisions involving a personal injury or a fatality.

The source of the information for the Traffic Collision Statistics publication is the Traffic Accident Police Investigation Report (MV6020). When a police officer attends a collision, the report is most often completed at the scene.

ICBC also collects information on injury incidents identified through insurance claims. Claims-based injury incidents totaled approximately 44,000 in 1999, compared to around 20,000 police-reported injury collisions. There are several reasons for this discrepancy. Police-reported traffic collision statistics have never captured all vehicle crashes in the province. Collision reporting thresholds and non-reporting of low severity "reportable" collisions result in the exclusion of thousands of crashes. Since 1995, this situation has been exacerbated by the reduction in police attendance and reporting of collisions by many police agencies. While the reporting of property damage only collisions continues to decline each year, the reporting of injury and fatal collisions has remained at about the same level since 1997.

Even with these qualifications, the Traffic Collision Statistics provides valuable information on casualty collisions that is not available from other sources. For example, contributing factors such as alcohol or unsafe speed, restraint use and types of crash locations and configurations, to name a few. Police-reported traffic collision statistics are used to support traffic safety programs such as CounterAttack; to evaluate new provincial road safety initiatives; for monitoring commercial vehicle collision trends and commercial vehicle safety programs; to identify unsafe road locations; for highway planning and for guiding the development of policies and programs to reduce the frequency and severity of collisions in the Province.